topbar

The Pick of the Best of the Smaller Museums

Rate this

The Meiji Jingu Treasure Museum

One hundred items that belonged to Emperor Meiji including his clothes and desk are all on display inside the Meiji Jingu Treasure Museum. There are even some of the poems he wrote.

Situated in the grounds of the Meiji Jingu Shrine, the building is one of Tokyo’s finest, a real treasure. The surrounding land used to be a paddy field, but now it’s beautiful pasture often adorned with wild flowers.

Essential Data

Hours:

9:00 am – 4:00 pm (4:30 in the summer). The museum is open on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays only.
How to get there:

Take the JR Yamanote LINE to Harajuku Station, and then follow the signs from within the grounds of the Meiji Jingu Shrine.

Ticket prices:

Adults: 500 yen Children: 200 yen

Other places to visit nearby:

The Meiji Jingu Shrine, Yoyogi Park, Harajuku, Shibuya, Shinjuku.

The Sumo Wrestling Museum

Very small, but certainly unique to Japan, so who can argue that the Sumo Wrestling Museum isn’t worth a visit? The exhibits include pictures of the all-time greats and various associated memorabilia. If you’re lucky, you might even catch a real life wrestler or two!

As you go in make sure you pick up the free booklet, as well as photographic illustrations of some of the moves, it’s packed full of information explaining the history and origin of sumo.

Essential Data

Hours:

10:00 am to 4:30 pm, most days

Ticket Price:

Free

How to get there:

The museum is located inside the Kokugikan Sumo Wrestling Stadium. Take the JR Sobu local line train to Ryogoku Station. Use the West Exit, then follow the signs to the Edo Tokyo Museum. En route, you should be able to see the sumo stadium. It’s the octagonal building with the green roof.

Other places to visit nearby:

The Edo Tokyo Museum and the Kanto Earthquake Memorial Museum and Shrine.

The NHK Broadcasting Museum

The first NHK broadcast to the nation was on March 22 1925. The NHK Broadcasting Museum marks the spot where that first radio broadcast was made.

Inside, there’s a look at how the 1964 Tokyo Olympics advanced broadcasting technology. Also there’s a chance to read your own news bulletin (in English) and to go on a picturesque journey to virtually nowhere on board the train journey simulator.

Essential Data

Hours:

Open 9:30 to 4:30 Tuesday to Sunday.
Closed: Mondays (except public holidays)
Tuesday if Monday was a public holiday. It’s also closed Dec 26 to Jan 4 (inclusive).

Ticket prices:

Free!

How to get there:

The nearest station is Kamyiyacho Station, which is on the Hibiya Subway Line. It’s not a long walk from the station, but be warned, it could be quite an adventure.

Take exit 3 out of the station. Once out, look at the overhead road signs and walk down the larger of the two roads in the direction of Yokohama and Gotanda. Just after the Deutsche Bank turn right, and then continue down this road until you get to a tunnel. Look carefully, going up the side of the tunnel you should see a small set of steps. At this point, start climbing, and when you reach the top, with any luck, the museum should be waiting.

Other places to visit nearby:

Tokyo Tower

Yushukan War Memorial Musuem

Situated in the grounds of Yasukuni Jinja Shrine, the Yushukan War Memorial Museum is dedicated to those who lost their lives at war.

Together with the “human torpedo” you’ll find military and Red Cross uniforms, tin helmets, armour, bows and arrows plus paintings of various historical battles.

Essential Data

Hours:

Open: 9:00 am – 5:00pm (4:30 in winter)
Closed: August 28th – 31st (inclusive)
December 28th – December 31st (inclusive)

Ticket prices:

Adults: 500 yen
Students: 300 yen,
13 to 18 year olds: 200 yen,
6 to 13 year olds: 100 yen.

How to get there:

Take the Hanzomon Subway line, the Tozai Subway Line or THE Toei-Shinjuku Line to Kudanshita Station. The museum is in the grounds of Yasukuni Shrine.

Further information:

The Yasukuni Shrine Homepage: www.yasukuni.or.jp/

Other places to visit nearby:

Yasukuni Shrine, Jimbocho and Ochanomizu, The Science Museum.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes